See and Say CNN: Always Saying What It Wants To See

By
November 5, 2012

CNN did well in its earliest years because it functioned like a news organization. It said what it saw, reporting it as fact. Now, it’s just so much Gobbledygook, forever putting some spin on something.

What the Hell? As long as it says, moderate, nonindependent  Tea Party and Obama wins, maybe it simply doesn’t even give a chit. But you will be hard pressed to make much sense of this.  These aren’t your parents moderate, centrist – insert whatever definition you want here – they’re Obama voters, or something.

Let’s wait and see about that.  I won’t be floored if Obama wins as an incumbent. Nor will I ever be convinced it will be because of how CNN portrayed it, after they and others slanted the coverage to get there. Just ask CBS about that, leaving valuable Benghazi video on the floor before all but being forced to drop it last minute after, I assume, they view it as too late to influence much of anything. They are as shameless as they were the day Dan Rather crashed under a flurry of new media assaults.

- The final polls are out and behind the national horse race is a fascinating dynamic – Mitt Romney is narrowly winning independent voters while President Obama is winning centrist voters by a nearly 20-point margin.

For example, here in the must-win battleground state of Ohio, the final CNN/ORC poll showed Romney edging Obama among independent voters by two points, 48% to 46%. But among moderate voters, Obama is crushing Romney by 21 points – 57% to 36%.

For example, here in the must-win battleground state of Ohio, the final CNN/ORC poll showed Romney edging Obama among independent voters by two points, 48% to 46%. But among moderate voters, Obama is crushing Romney by 21 points – 57% to 36%.

This is significant because in past elections independents and centrist voters have been largely synonymous–overlapping cohorts, reflecting the belief of many independents that the two parties are too polarized and disproportionately dominated by their respective special interests. But what I think we’re seeing this year is the extended impact of the tea party – a growth in the number of independent conservatives that has moved the overall independent voting block slightly to the right. In turn, centrist voters are more likely to vote for Obama precisely because of the polarizing impact of the tea party and the intransigence of many conservative congressmen when it came to working in a good faith spirit of principled compromise with the Obama administration.

National polls also bear this dynamic out. In the final Pew poll of this election, Romney is winning independent voters by a three point margin, 44% to 41%. But Obama is winning centrist voters by a 21-point margin – 56% to 25%. One reason for this split can also be found in the poll – the least popular group in Washington is congressional Republicans who have just a 28% approval rating. This makes the case for possibly giving Republicans unified control of Washington again a tougher sell to swing voters.

This split is one reason the election is so close – and it might also account for why Obama has a narrow lead in many swing states. Romney’s surge after his strong performance in the first debate was due to reassuring moderate voters that he was one of them – not a “severe conservative” but a centrist Republican governor of a blue state with a commitment to bipartisanship. But in the wake of his leadership in Superstorm Sandy – earning the praise of Republican governor Chris Christie and the endorsement of independent New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg along with Colin Powell – Obama has been able to regain his momentum among moderates in the polls.

via CNN.com Blogs.



AdSense 300×250
NewsMax Trending Now
Comments:
  1. Esau's Message says:

    It sounds like they need to go back to the drawing board on the design of this poll.